Notes from the Now

Archive for the ‘Technology’ Category

10Readings – Jan 11- Feb 7 #recommended

In Art, Books, Education, History, literature, news, photography, Social Media, sociology, Technology on February 7, 2016 at 11:55 pm

Books

Humans of New York

When My Brother was an Aztec

Bad Feminist

Lobster is the Best Medicine

Web

One-Touch to Inbox Zero — Forte Labs — Medium

The real reasons behind the U.S. teacher shortage

Read This Before Co-Opting MLK Jr.

Ella Taught Me: Shattering the Myth of the Leaderless Movement

What School Segregation Looks Like

Twitter’s Brainstorming Notes for Potential New Features.

 

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Unsolicited Recommendations – January 2015

In Books, Chicago, Education, Events, Film, literature, music, Technology, University of Chicago on February 8, 2015 at 9:30 am

Randomly:

App –  Microsoft’s Outlook App for the iPhone is great (so far) for those of us who have to use exchange for our work-lives.  I get that it’s a rebrand of some technology that Microsoft bought, but from my point of view I’m less concerned about the app’s origin and mostly concerned w/ functionality.

Book – I didn’t read much in January, but I did enjoy* (with the caveat that “enjoy” is constrained to the genre, and the rules of the genre, thus a business book is always just an insight or two wrapped in a litany of stories that are an odd mix of poor decisions or common sense) Scaling Excellence:  Getting to more without settling for less.

Graphic Novel – Rob Rodi’s “Thor & Loki:  Blood Brothers” was a fun read.

Album –  I’m of the (advanced) age where “Sukierae” by Tweedy sounds good to me.

Documentary –  Two documentaries from Netflix that I enjoyed in January were: “Something Ventured” on American Venture Capitalism and the 3-D printing documentary “Print the Legend

Film –  Selma!  Powerful.

Articles – I don’t (yet) have a good method of tracking the best articles I’ve read online, but from memory, I enjoyed:  Next City’s profile of Derek Douglas (who happens to be my boss at UChicago), everything about this Humans of New York profiling a school in Brooklyn story,  and John Lewis’s take on Selma and its attendant controversies.

TV – PBS’s “Shakespeare Uncovered” is good.  The King Lear episode might make you rethink how original “Empire” is.   Also,  Star Wars: Rebels manages to channel the spirit of Star Wars in an enjoyable way.

Events/Speakers – You should try to see Cornel West in person.  He’s very present in his surroundings and engaged with his audience.  Also, if there are more events surrounding the School Project in Chicago, you should go.  Passionately committed people trying to figure out how to make education work in chicago (particularly after the school closings).

“Watching the wheels go by”

In Events, photography, Technology, University of Chicago on January 23, 2015 at 11:23 pm

via Instagram http://ift.tt/1yFxYvV

Review: The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers

In Books, Technology, University of Chicago on June 8, 2014 at 9:00 am

The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers
The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers by Ben Horowitz
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

In April I had the opportunity to see Ben Horovitz at the University of Chicago’s Chicago innovation exchange. He was there on his book tour for the hard thing about hard things, and participated in a lively and engaging discussion with Steve Edwards. I liked the forthrightness that Horowitz had when talking about the things for which there are no instruction manual and the examples he used to explain how he was able to turn his ideas/observations in strategies or values that could be used in his companies.  He had personality, which isn’t what you usually get from authors of “business” books.

The book does a pretty good job of conveying that personality and giving some nice examples of approaches to tough situations – it’s thought-provoking and an enjoyable read.  That said, you can’t quite replicate the moxie that Horowitz has (or replicate the rules that govern the industry/environs/times that his focus is on) so it’s more inspirational than a how-to manual.

Review: Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel

In Books, Technology on August 11, 2013 at 4:29 pm

Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel
Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel by Michio Kaku
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Wonderful read that ties our collective imagination of what we wish was possible, to our theoretical understandings of science, to the work that is presently being done. Well-written and engaging. Doesn’t try to go back to the beginning on every topic, so you’ll probably enjoy this more if you’ve got some background to begin with.

 

weconnectchicago.org

In Chicago, Technology on April 14, 2013 at 8:48 pm

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Nice seeing the ads on the CTA for the city’s efforts to connect people to tech resources.

Replacement Computer

In Technology on April 3, 2013 at 9:49 pm

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After months of hardware level problems and many trips to the apple store, my 2009 iMac was taken back by apple and a new replacement machine was sent my way (at no charge).

I’m computing in the future now!

A Biscuit, A Cup of Tea, and then a Twelve Hour Shift #apple #NYT

In Technology on January 23, 2012 at 6:01 pm

 

The NYT piece “Apple, America and a Squeezed Middle Class” is worth reading, and then rereading.   The example of the iPhone glass screen and the resulting discussion about the supply chain, manufacturing processes, and jobs – both skilled and semi-skilled, is a wonderful foundation for the kinds of discussions that need to be taking place about what the high-tech sector can and can not do for the American job market, and for determining where the sweet spots for American technical education/training may be.